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Definition of Strain

Strain

  1. A cultural subvariety that is only slightly differentiated.
  2. Race; stock; generation; descent; family.
  3. Hereditary character, quality, or disposition.
  4. Rank; a sort.
  5. To draw with force; to extend with great effort; to stretch; as, to strain a rope; to strain the shrouds of a ship; to strain the cords of a musical instrument.
  6. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as forces on a beam to bend it.
  7. To exert to the utmost; to ply vigorously.
  8. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in the matter of intent or meaning; as, to strain the law in order to convict an accused person.
  9. To injure by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force; as, the gale strained the timbers of the ship.
  10. To injure in the muscles or joints by causing to make too strong an effort; to harm by overexertion; to sprain; as, to strain a horse by overloading; to strain the wrist; to strain a muscle.
  11. To squeeze; to press closely.
  12. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain.
  13. To urge with importunity; to press; as, to strain a petition or invitation.
  14. To press, or cause to pass, through a strainer, as through a screen, a cloth, or some porous substance; to purify, or separate from extraneous or solid matter, by filtration; to filter; as, to strain milk through cloth.
  15. To make violent efforts.
  16. To percolate; to be filtered; as, water straining through a sandy soil.
  17. The act of straining, or the state of being strained.
  18. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles; as, he lifted the weight with a strain; the strain upon a ship's rigging in a gale; also, the hurt or injury resulting; a sprain.
  19. A change of form or dimensions of a solid or liquid mass, produced by a stress.
  20. A portion of music divided off by a double bar; a complete musical period or sentence; a movement, or any rounded subdivision of a movement.
  21. Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, oration, book, etc.; theme; motive; manner; style; also, a course of action or conduct; as, he spoke in a noble strain; there was a strain of woe in his story; a strain of trickery appears in his career.
  22. Turn; tendency; inborn disposition. Cf. 1st Strain.

Strain Quotations

There was a great strain in our family because my father didn't want anything to do with me. He was happy to see my brother and sister, but not me. I don't know why. Maybe it was shame. I don't know. But he never wanted anything to do with me. That rejection was terribly hurtful and it went on for years.
Carol Vorderman

You never have a comedian who hasn't got a very deep strain of sadness within him or her. Every great clown has been very near to tragedy.
Margaret Rutherford

I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply ALL my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.
Og Mandino

With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.
Abraham Lincoln

As a great man's influence never ends, so also there is not definite finality, no end, to a great survey; it runs along for centuries, ever responsive to the strain of the increasing needs of a growing population and an enlarging domain.
Cleveland Abbe
More "Strain" Quotations

Strain Translations

strain in French is accablement
strain in German is anstrengen, Anspannung {f}
strain in Italian is aggravio, fatica
strain in Latin is intendo, nixor, nixus
strain in Spanish is esfuerzo, gravamen, colar