Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Definition of Strain

Strain

  1. A cultural subvariety that is only slightly differentiated.
  2. Race; stock; generation; descent; family.
  3. Hereditary character, quality, or disposition.
  4. Rank; a sort.
  5. To draw with force; to extend with great effort; to stretch; as, to strain a rope; to strain the shrouds of a ship; to strain the cords of a musical instrument.
  6. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as forces on a beam to bend it.
  7. To exert to the utmost; to ply vigorously.
  8. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in the matter of intent or meaning; as, to strain the law in order to convict an accused person.
  9. To injure by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force; as, the gale strained the timbers of the ship.
  10. To injure in the muscles or joints by causing to make too strong an effort; to harm by overexertion; to sprain; as, to strain a horse by overloading; to strain the wrist; to strain a muscle.
  11. To squeeze; to press closely.
  12. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain.
  13. To urge with importunity; to press; as, to strain a petition or invitation.
  14. To press, or cause to pass, through a strainer, as through a screen, a cloth, or some porous substance; to purify, or separate from extraneous or solid matter, by filtration; to filter; as, to strain milk through cloth.
  15. To make violent efforts.
  16. To percolate; to be filtered; as, water straining through a sandy soil.
  17. The act of straining, or the state of being strained.
  18. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles; as, he lifted the weight with a strain; the strain upon a ship's rigging in a gale; also, the hurt or injury resulting; a sprain.
  19. A change of form or dimensions of a solid or liquid mass, produced by a stress.
  20. A portion of music divided off by a double bar; a complete musical period or sentence; a movement, or any rounded subdivision of a movement.
  21. Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, oration, book, etc.; theme; motive; manner; style; also, a course of action or conduct; as, he spoke in a noble strain; there was a strain of woe in his story; a strain of trickery appears in his career.
  22. Turn; tendency; inborn disposition. Cf. 1st Strain.

Strain Quotations

I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply ALL my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.
Og Mandino

There was a great strain in our family because my father didn't want anything to do with me. He was happy to see my brother and sister, but not me. I don't know why. Maybe it was shame. I don't know. But he never wanted anything to do with me. That rejection was terribly hurtful and it went on for years.
Carol Vorderman

As a great man's influence never ends, so also there is not definite finality, no end, to a great survey; it runs along for centuries, ever responsive to the strain of the increasing needs of a growing population and an enlarging domain.
Cleveland Abbe

At a time when we're having to take such difficult decisions about how to cut back without damaging the things that matter the most, we should strain every sinew to cut error, waste and fraud.
David Cameron

With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.
Abraham Lincoln
More "Strain" Quotations

Strain Translations

strain in French is accablement
strain in German is anstrengen, Anspannung {f}
strain in Italian is aggravio, fatica
strain in Latin is intendo, nixor, nixus
strain in Spanish is esfuerzo, gravamen, colar