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Definition of Reason

Reason

  1. A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument.
  2. The faculty or capacity of the human mind by which it is distinguished from the intelligence of the inferior animals; the higher as distinguished from the lower cognitive faculties, sense, imagination, and memory, and in contrast to the feelings and desires. Reason comprises conception, judgment, reasoning, and the intuitional faculty. Specifically, it is the intuitional faculty, or the faculty of first truths, as distinguished from the understanding, which is called the discursive or ratiocinative faculty.
  3. Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; justice.
  4. Ratio; proportion.
  5. To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts.
  6. Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue.
  7. To converse; to compare opinions.
  8. To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss; as, I reasoned the matter with my friend.
  9. To support with reasons, as a request.
  10. To persuade by reasoning or argument; as, to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan.
  11. To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; -- with down; as, to reason down a passion.
  12. To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; -- usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon.

Reason Quotations

The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.
George Carlin

The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't happen at once.
Albert Einstein

Unconditional love really exists in each of us. It is part of our deep inner being. It is not so much an active emotion as a state of being. It's not 'I love you' for this or that reason, not 'I love you if you love me.' It's love for no reason, love without an object.
Ram Dass

Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it. - Henry Ford
Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it.
Henry Ford

On one hand, we know that everything happens for a reason, and there are no mistakes or coincidences. On the other hand, we learn that we can never give up, knowing that with the right tools and energy, we can reverse any decree or karma. So, which is it? Let the Light decide, or never give up? The answer is: both.
Yehuda Berg
More "Reason" Quotations

Reason Translations

reason in Afrikaans is rede
reason in Dutch is reden, oorzaak
reason in French is raison, raisonnent, raisonnons, raisonnez, cause
reason in German is Verstand, Grund, Vernunft
reason in Italian is ragione
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